Archive for the television Category

Double Feature Review: Zeta Gundam (1985-86) and Char’s Counterattack (1988)

Posted in anime, future + scifi, japan, reviews/opinions, television on March 4, 2014 by reccaphoenix

**Note: I wrote this post some time ago and somehow neglected to publish it.  Finally got around to it, put in some minor updates.**

Continuing with my recent trend of Gundam-shows-by-Tomino/Universal Century Gundam shows, I immediately started watching Zeta (the direct, 5-years-later sequel to MS Gundam) and followed up with Char’s Counterattack.
*note for nerds: I realize that I’m not being totally chronological here: Double Zeta review possibly to come later, I’m in the middle of that one now*

If this review had to be one word: Wow.  If this review had to be one sentence: Zeta has everything that MS Gundam has…times 3.

First, and least importantly, there is at least 3 times the face slapping and punching.  There was enough to base a whole drinking game on.  Amuro got his fair share of the “Bright slap” back in MS Gundam and now Kamille gets his.  Kamille is initially even more of a whiny little bastard than Amuro was, so I can’t say that he didn’t deserve some of them, but I started feeling sorry for him when he gets the crap beat out of him by Wong-san, especially because that was partially motivated by Haro.  Haro gets too much abuse in this show.

3 times the drama. At least:  the Newtype emotional drama, which really only played into the final episodes of MS Gundam, takes center stage here.  There are more Newtypes…and many female Newtypes.  You can see what’s coming.

This brings me to another point.  Gundam series have become increasingly derivative of Zeta and MS Gundam since those shows aired, even if the new series are “alternate universe” affairs.  And sadly, even Zeta jumps on that train a little.  The first time we had newtype love + tragic death in a 3-person fight (via Lalah/Amuro/Char) it was sad.  This time, Amuro/Char (can’t remember which) even points out that “gee, it’s just like that OTHER SERIES.”  But they do it again.  And it’s still sad.  But it happens again in Char’s Counterattack…which I’ll get to.

The Song: I LOVE the first opening, Zeta: Toki o Koete.  I love that it is the Neil Sedaka song “Better Days Are Coming” with Tomino-penned spacey lyrics and funky ’80s electronic instruments.  I’ve learned to play it on my ukulele and I play and sing it bossa nova style all the friggin’ time now.  It has become my favorite anime opening of all time.  Interesting note: the ending theme and second opening are also both Japanese-lyrics versions of Neil Sedaka (which is why they are not on the US DVDs).

Character Development:  Seeing so many characters return from the last series was fantastic, and I loved most of the “new guys” just as much.  Here’s some impressions:

  • Kai Shiden is a total badass now, not just a snarky teen.  What they did with this character was great, even though he didn’t show up much.
  • What happened to Sayla?  She only appears for a second, and doesn’t even talk.  I love Sayla and I wish that she had played more of a role in the sequels.  Apparently she and Amuro had more of a romance in the novels of MS Gundam and they even had sexy time on the White Base.  Whhaaaaat.  Does Bright Noa allow sexy time on the White Base?  Or does he overlook it because he is too busy checking out Miss Mirai Yashima.  You KNOW that staring at her backside for months had to be one of the motivating factors behind that sudden “Hey girl, Mirai, I can be that guy for you” confession (so cute) in the latter part of MS Gundam.  But I digress.  (Keep it together!!!)
  • Amuro is a lot cooler now.  It is really interesting to see an emotional teenage boy grow up into someone struggling with his past and reluctant to go back to fighting.
  • Four Murasame: I can’t. I’ll start crying.  FOUUUURRRRR….you were so ’80s-tastic.
  • Rosamia Badam I could do without.  She’s another anime “Onii-chan”-ing clinger.  This has basically become a trope by now, and–big surprise–it happens again in other Gundam series.
  • I loved the return of all the MS Gundam characters.  It was fantastic.  Even though Mirai Yashima, er, Mirai Noa is a housewife now.
  • I’m going to stop now before I start ranting again.

This is all really disorganized, but I’ll sum it up: See this series, especially if you’ve seen the original MS Gundam.  It’s amazing.  I’d rather urge you to see it than fill in my likely-to-be-novel-length list of opinions on Zeta.

Char’s Counterattack

Don’t get me wrong, this is a really good movie.  But I have some issues with it.  Warning: serious spoiler alerts, because I want to discuss this one fully.

Another time-jump in Universal Century brings us into a situation where Char and Amuro are on opposite sides of the battlefield again.  And the old Lalah situation comes back to haunt them.  Ironically (of course), there’s a new love triangle….er….polygon brewing with our new characters, Hathaway Noa (obligatory kid-of-chara-from-original-series), resident Char fangirl Quess, Char’s lady friend Nanai, Char, Amuro, Chen Agi (substitute Beltorchika-san for the movie), and Char’s assistant Gyunei.  So maybe it’s not so derivative.  Char’s cooking up a plan to attack the earth and Amuro has to stop him.  That’s the plot, basically.

New characters.  Quite a few of them.  Here’s my take on a couple:

  • Quess Paraya: if you didn’t already notice from my assessment of Quess as the “resident Char fangirl,” I don’t particularly like this character.  I think she’s interesting, but her execution veers into Mary Sue territory.  As if somebody said “Oh boy, I’m gonna write a fanfic where I’m a super cute girl who’s the BEST PILOT EVAR and I fall in love with Char Aznable and Amuro and they fight over meeee.”  That being said, Tomino writes believable teenagers, and I’ve known a few girls like this.  Still, I would’ve liked to have seen her not blatantly state her motivations and feelings all the time.  Show don’t tell, geez.  But we’re working with a two hour movie, so I can forgive the filmmakers on this one.  Lalah is how a character like this should be written, Quess is not.  But we’re dealing with 20 years of separation, and cute plucky girl had become more of an anime trope by the early ’90s.  And I guess Gundam was missing a Lolita type character aside from Elpeo Puru in ZZ (who I would trade for Quess any day).
  • Hathaway: Basically, Hathaway is like the Katz Kobayashi of this movie.  Kid-from-older-series-returns-and-repeats-mistakes-of-older-generation.  But I don’t have any complaints.  He has a Haro, and you all know that I LOVE HARO.
  • Gyunei: I liked this one.  He was interesting, given that he is really loyal to Char but also intensely wants Quess for himself.  I also don’t think we’ve seen a volunteer artificial Newtype yet (i.e. not all messed up in the head), so that was interesting.
  • Haro (just kidding): Seriously, though, I love Haro and I wish he had more screen time in every single Gundam series, if only to say “HARO. HARO AMURO” and tell everybody when they are emotionally stressed.  Everybody should have a Haro.  I want a Haro.  The closest I have is the Haro alarm clock I got for Christmas, which keeps calling me “Amuro” for some reason.
  • Nanai: I love that Char has a love interest who is not Lalah.  Especially after Amuro got one/two (Beltorchika/Chen).  And the fact that (uh, spoiler) Char is really just manipulating all of these love interests and others makes it all so interesting.  That being said, it was kind of inevitable that the film ends the way it does, because I don’t think he could have kept up the double-crossing.

It’s that very double-crossing and manipulation that, along with his crazy plan, turned Char into a “bad guy” again (for me at least).  Char/Quattro is still sympathetic but he is not Quattro anymore.  He’s not the cool mentor that he was in Zeta.  This is a brilliant turn of events and really makes the film “work” for me, especially because Amuro and Char made so much headway towards forgiving each other (or at least tolerating each other) in Zeta.  The only one who was totally unforgiving of Char then seemed to be Kai Shiden, and we know how he rolls.  Snark snark.

Admittedly, Char’s whole drop-colony-on-Earth plan starts the fight, though.  And that’s another thing – Char wants to save the earth, and even though his colony drop would make everybody evacuate, a nuclear winter isn’t the most environmentally friendly of methods for doing that.  So the whole idea seems a little forced.  What made Char change so much between Zeta and here?  Was it the fact that the Argama replaced its emotionally laden teens and badass women with a plucky group of scavenger kiddies and that the show got all cartoony?  But I digress.

Anyhow, as I said before, Newtype love triangles are getting old at this point.  It’s hard to get emotionally invested in this one, because we only just met the new characters.  Well, OK, we “knew” Hathaway as a child, but he had no lines and didn’t do anything.  And literally, the original Newtype love triangle is at the root of this entire movie.  The one sentence summary for this one is “Two grown men are still fighting about the same thing and keep fighting about it till they die fighting about it.”  It’s kind of funny that they just keep going at it until the end.

However we got into this Amuro-Char standoff, though, it’s happening.  So what do I think of it?  Like I said, the movie itself is on par with Zeta in terms of quality in storytelling and characters.  But the movie format compresses everything, which can make characters’ actions make less sense.  It also gives us less time to learn about the new batch (Quess, Hathaway, Chen, Char’s love interest, etc.) – as a new series, this film could have been fantastic.  I probably would have liked it better.  But what we get is still great and a good “makeup” for the goofiness of Double Zeta, which I’m sure most fans appreciated.  (I myself have yet to form a solid opinion of ZZ because I’m still watching it).

Some additional notes of the humor variety:

  • I love that Gyunei straight up says that Char  has “lolicon” (Lolita complex).  I figure somebody might have noticed that over the years.  I guess he never got over Lalah and, like Humbert Humbert, is forever chasing the memory of preteen love.  How old is Quess again? 13? Er, uncomfortable.  Although at the end of the film it seems that they didn’t really have a “thing” after all.
  • I was shocked that Beltorchika-san was not around (wasn’t she Amuro’s “girlfriend” or whatever?), only to find out that Beltorchika literally replaces Chen’s role in Tomino’s novelization of the movie.  That makes sense.  Why not use Beltorchika, though?
  • It was nice to see Mirai Noa again.  Will she ever get into space to see her husband?  Has she been trying since Zeta?  That’s so sad….
  • Amuro has literally been wearing the same kind of underwear since the space ’70s.  No, I’m serious, it’s in the movie.  Ha ha ha.  Let’s hope it’s not the same set, although if Fraw Bow was the only thing that got Amuro into the shower back in MS Gundam, maybe he’s still that much of a slob.  Gross.
  • Speaking of which, Boyfriend and I had a running joke that Bright Noa only owns two outfits: (1) Earth Federation uniform; and (2) space suit.  Evidenced by the fact that even when he joined the AEUG in Zeta, he kept wearing the Earth Federation (the enemy’s!) uniform.  And I’m pretty sure that he’s been wearing THE SAME uniform the whole time because you can’t get new clothes in space.
  • Who the hell gave Bright Noa EYEBALLS?  He looks so weird.  I know the ’70s style characters didn’t necessarily mesh with all the others, but I liked them that way.  I lost faith in humanity when Bright Noa got whites in his eyes.  Now I should really get that tattoo back piece of Bright Noa bitch-slapping Amuro Ray with Japanese ukiyo-e waves in the background and a Haro flying through the sky….but I digress.

A Conclusion

After these two, I started up Double Zeta (the direct sequel to Zeta), which I’ll cover in another review when I finish it.  It’s a huge, sudden, and extremely awkward tone shift after Zeta’s depressing drama bomb ending, and I’ve got mixed feelings at the moment.

And I just felt like I wanted more.  There are still so many unanswered questions and untold stories about the White Base and Argama crews.  I couldn’t help but long for a “third” series – a series that could be to Zeta what Zeta was to MS Gundam.  But at the same time, I could see that Char’s Counterattack was starting to get derivative.  Even the alternate universe Gundam shows are mostly derivative now, so would we really want rehash after rehash of the same old stories and Newtype drama with Bright Noa’s children and all the others?  Perhaps it’s for the best.  Often, shows that people wanted to keep going but ended instead are the most fondly remembered.

I know that Gundam Unicorn tried to pick up the Universal Century story recently, but I haven’t watched it so I can’t speak to the quality of that show.  I figure that if it was a truly good sequel, I probably would have heard more about it, and Tomino wasn’t involved.  My next steps are to watch all of the Tomino Gundam series, Space Runaway Ideon, and perhaps Gundam Unicorn (despite its silly name).  I’ll be reporting back here, maybe, after I do that (if I do).

As always,

Recca

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Gundam Drinking Games: MS Gundam and Zeta Gundam Edition

Posted in anime, fun stuff to do, future + scifi, television with tags , , , on March 17, 2013 by reccaphoenix

If you couldn’t tell by my last post, Boyfriend and I have been on a Gundam kick lately. Well, it’s more my fault. I wanted to watch Char’s Counterattack because it is so acclaimed, but Boyfriend said that I needed to finish MS Gundam and its sequel Zeta Gundam first or I wouldn’t understand it. So we’ve spent a lot of the past month marathonning Gundam at various points. And then I got into another one of my periodic anime-watching phases, it being Spring Break and whatnot, and started watching the fantastic steampunky-alternate-universe Turn A Gundam concurrently with Zeta. I’ll probably end up watching every series by Tomino (the creator of the original series) someday.

Image

Photo by Flickr user Bryoz

Anyhow, because I posted the Gundam Wing Drinking Game after my previous rewatching-a-Gundam-show experience, and because the other day a party fell through and I ended up inventing a Zeta Gundam drinking game with Boyfriend, I thought I’d share two more fabulous Gundam drinking games.
A “point” can be whatever you want it to be, based on the strength of your alcohol of choice. A sip, a shot, a whole glass….whatever. Feel free to inform me of the results of your fun times with these games. I designed them for watching around, oh, four or five episodes in a sitting. If you go for a longer marathon, proceed with caution.
Disclaimer for the niños: if you are not legally old enough to drink alcohol, don’t drink alcohol. Play this game with refreshing, delicious water instead.

Zeta Gundam Drinking Game

  • 2 points for every face slap or face punch (there are way more here than in MS Gundam, so proceed with caution).
  • 1 point every time somebody says that Kamille has a girl’s name
  • 1 point every time somebody implores Kamille to be a man or act like a man.
  • 2 point penalty drink if you so much as snicker when hearing a character say the name “Quattro Bajeena” (this one gets me every time).
  • 1 point for every mention of the events of the previous series (in however much detail you deem appropriate).
  • 1 point each time you see recycled animation
  • (optional: 1 point when Kamille whines that nobody understands him)

…..and now for the ’70s one:

Mobile Suit Gundam Drinking Game

  • 1 point for every use of a recycled Gundam transformation sequence (excluding the opening theme) [OR every moment that seems explicity designed to sell a toy].
  • 3 points for every face slap or face punch.
  • 2 points for every Mirai Yashima romance moment
  • 1 point for any character’s surprise at how the Gundam does not blow up with one hit
  • 1 point for every time anyone acts creepy or fanboyish around Matilda-san
  • 1 point for Kai Shiden snark. Extra point if he gets slapped or punched in retaliation for the snark.
  • 1 point for every time Fraw Bow brings Amuro food, tells him to take a shower, or mommies him in some other way.
  • 2 points for every awkward eating scene
  • 1 point for the pack-o’-orphans making a contribution to the outcome of battle.
  • 2 points for awkward shower/bath scene.
  • 1 point penalty drink for every time anyone says “huh?”/”what?”/wtf at any psychedelic trippiness.
  • (optional: 2 point penalty drink if you laugh at the Guntank or any other silly mech)

I hope you have a grand ol’ time with these games!


Remember, kids, Sleggar Law sez: “Drink responsibly and remember to slap a bitch if he/she gets outta line.”

–Recca 3/17/13

Review: Mobile Suit Gundam (1979)

Posted in anime, future + scifi, japan, reviews/opinions, television with tags , , on March 15, 2013 by reccaphoenix

Long absence, I know.  But I just wanted to share my thoughts on a remarkable little anime series from the ’70s.

When I was 13, and a big nerdy Gundam Wing fangirl, Cartoon Network started showing Mobile Suit Gundam after the conclusion of Wing.  I stopped watching the show after a few episodes because I didn’t like any of the characters and I thought it was lame and cliche.  But boy, did I misjudge it.

I just finished watching the entire series (in Japanese, if you must know) and I really enjoyed it.  If you compare it with everything that came before (cartoony giant robots), it was really groundbreaking.

A quick summary for the uninitiated (no spoilers): This is the first show in the long-running Gundam series, which involves vaguely samurai-like humanoid giant robots in some variety of warfare.  In MS Gundam, Amuro Ray and a group of military and civilians survive an attack on their space colony and are drawn into conflict with the evil Principality of Zeon.  World War II…IN SPACE, sort of.

My favorite point came towards the end of the series, where there are some truly avant-garde psychedelic (and most likely 2001: A Space Odyssey-inspired) moments as the series spirals quickly towards its epic conclusion.

Speaking of influences from other films, I definitely can feel some Star Trek influence in MS Gundam.  The multicultural cast (their names are a combination of German, Japanese, Spanish, English, and other influences), strong military women, and “space navy” theme are clearly present.  On that note, I think that MS Gundam most likely started the Gundam series’ tradition of strong female characters.  Sayla, Hamon, and Lalah are some tough and awesome ladies and were enjoyable to follow through the series.

I enjoy anime from the 1970s – the hand-drawn dusty cel look is charming to me, I guess.  The retro look and feel of MS Gundam is great, as is the disco-style funky battle music and J-folk ending theme.  While the opening theme song recalls other giant robot series in that it is mainly about the Gundam itself, it’s catchy, upbeat, and infectiously fun.

Let’s talk about the characters, which are really the best thing in the show, in my opinion.  These are some of the best-loved characters in Japan and I hope my descriptions and opinions here do them justice.

Let’s start with the White Base crew.  I grew to love this bunch of tough folks with funny names, along with the obligatory pack-o’-orphans (Kikka, Katz, and Letz) that add comic relief here and there.  MS Gundam gets in a lot of character development, which is one thing that Gundam Wing didn’t do so well (there were really too many characters).  Amuro has his issues and moments, but that’s probably realistically to be expected of a teenage boy.  My boyfriend and I both posited that we would probably be the Kai Shiden of the group if thrown into the same situation (laziness, snark, etc.).

…now for the bad guys.  While pretty much all the Zeons have something….kinda…wrong…with them in terms of appearance (they all have purple hair, weird body shapes, look sickly, etc), that just adds to their evil appearance.  Char Aznable, who Japanese people love “three times more” (qualifier used to describe Char’s mechas) than pretty much anything else, is a cool dude.  And the foundation for every masked baddie in anime (and every masked bad guy in Gundam, pretty much) since the ’70s.  Char was the only thing that kept me watching MS Gundam as a 13-year-old.

Did I mention that there is a lot of face slapping and punching?

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(c) Bandai/Sunrise/Sotsu Agency. Not my image.

 

….yeah.  Good to know that Kai gets slapped around almost as much as Amuro.  Slegger Law’s only purpose as a character is basically (1) to slap a bitch and (2) to hit on the ladies of White Base.

Okay, now for the bad points.  This show was made partially to sell toys.  So the Gundam does a lot of really goofy transforming stuff that is often used as episode filler.  Also, some of the designs weren’t quite up to the “realistic robot” standards that Tomino envisioned when he conceived of Gundam, and come off as…well, silly.  But I can’t really complain about this, since the Gundam and friends still look ten times more realistic than most of their contemporary giant robot brethren, who look like the mecha from Power Rangers or plastic toys.

Well, that’s it for my disorganized quick review blurb.  I hope you will check this series out, it’s a real gem.

(…and before you ask, yes, I am a colossal nerd and have already started watching the sequel, Zeta Gundam.  Will I review that?  Maybe.)

So It Goes – QI

Posted in shameless parody, so it goes, television with tags , , , on November 15, 2010 by reccaphoenix

This installment of “So It Goes,” our maybe-popular summary-parody series, tackles the sensationally clever and humorous quiz programme Q.I., hosted by the lovely and sticky and gorgeous Stephen Fry.  This is another of my favorites that I thoroughly enjoy, but can’t resist parodying.

So It Goes – Q.I.

A vaguely Jamaican-synth-elevator-muzak theme song is accompanied by some vaguely unexciting graphics.

Massive applause as we enter THE QI STUDIO!

Stephen Fry: Goooooooooooooooooo

this goes on for several minutes…

Stephen: …ooooooooooooooooooooood Evening! Good Evening! Good Evening!  And welcome to Q.I.!  Today’s episode is all about…..JAUTOMOBILES!

Erm….Stephen….I believe that starts with an “A”…..but we are in Series “J,” after all.

And it’s not the job of the italics to provide comment.  Do continue. ^^;;

Stephen: And today as our guests we have the lovely Jo Brand!

Jo has a smug look on her face.

Stephen: The not-British Rich Hall!

Rich looks vaguely angry.

Stephen: Bill Bailey!

Bill gives the camera a wry look.

Stephen: and…..Alan Davies.

Alan looks goofy.

Stephen: So, now that I have introduced all of you and everyone has laughed at Alan’s novelty buzzer noise, let’s begin.  Why do we not drive on the right side of the road in Britain?

A picture of an old man in a quaint British car driving along the road appears on the backdrop screens.

Alan: The Blue Whale!

Jo: My husband tried driving on the wrong side of the road once.  And then he still complained about me not hoovering the room the right way…

Rich: Because you’re wrong.

The audience laughs hysterically at Rich’s joke, while he sits there with the same angry expression, totally deadpan.

Stephen goes into a lengthy explanation of the answer.  All are amazed.

Stephen: Now, what animal….is larger than several large lorries?

Alan: The Blue Whale!

Wrong answer buzzers go off.

Audience laughs at Alan.

Alan: It had to be right this time, I thought….

Stephen once again corrects a succession of wrong answers with wit and grace.  All are amazed.

Jo: My husband was a lorry driver once…

Things continue in this vein for a good twenty minutes.

Stephen: Well, everyone, it’s time for the scores!

Stephen tallies up the scores somehow.  Alan places last.  Stephen provides a witty quote and the programme ends, everyone feeling satisfaction at having learned many quite interesting facts (no pun intended).

So It Goes – Jeeves and Wooster

Posted in shameless parody, so it goes, television with tags , , on October 25, 2010 by reccaphoenix

And now, a new series of humorous writings – “So It Goes.”  Each of these is a humorous treatment of how certain TV shows “always go”….and yes, my dry description here is killing the humor, I fear.  So I’ll get started.  And yes, I might do these in comic form someday, because text is boring.

So It Goes: Jeeves and Wooster

BERTIE WOOSTER, idle riche, is enjoying himself at his gentleman’s club.

Club Worker: Mr. Wooster, one of your rich and annoying female relatives is here to see you.

Bertie: I’m not here.

Club Worker: I already told her that.

Bertie meets with said relative.

Relative: Bertie, you have to fulfill a social obligation that will somehow impinge on your ridiculous amounts of free time.

Bertie: Never!

Relative: I’ll take some of your ridiculously large allowance if you don’t.

Bertie: I’ll do it then.

Bertie is at home in his bachelor pad.  He has just finished playing a jaunty novelty song on the piano.  Jeeves does not understand novelty songs.

Bertie: Jeeves, I have an ingenious plan to weasel out of my social obligation and/or solve a romantic problem of one or more of my good friends and cousins with unusual names.

Jeeves: Indeed, sir.

Bertie: Jeeves, you don’t approve?

Jeeves:……………..

Bertie:……………..

Jeeves: Very well, sir.

Bertie: Pack my bags!

Bertie and Jeeves have arrived at a stately country home, which will provide the setting for Bertie’s antics and failures.

Bertie has just embarrassed himself at dinner.

Bertie: What did I say that was wrong, Jeeves?  I thought I was very witty.

Jeeves: Indeed, sir.

Bertie: Well, nothing can interfere with my masterly plan which cannot possibly go wrong, seeing as it relies upon doing things in pitch-black darkness where I might mistake someone’s identity, and upon my having figured out exactly and precisely what everybody is thinking……

Jeeves: ……..Very good, sir.  Might I suggest instead that you do the much simpler thing and….

Jeeves outlines his much more sensible alternative.

Bertie: Don’t be silly, Jeeves.  My idea is foolproof.

Jeeves: Very good, sir.

Later that night, Bertie’s plan has spectacularly failed, yet Jeeves has come to his rescue somehow.  And everybody in the TV audience wonders how our young fool was saved.

Bertie: My God, Jeeves, how did you pull that one off?

Jeeves: Well, sir…..

Jeeves outlines his impeccably perfect plan for saving Bertie’s ass.

Bertie: I am so glad I hired you.

Jeeves: Indeed sir, perhaps I might perform some domestic chore for you?

Bertie: Go ahead.

-END-

This is actually one of my favorite shows.  I think the chemistry between Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie is just unbeatable.  Nonetheless, the formula is fun to poke fun at 😀

My PERSONAL Tops of the Decade (TV, Film, Video Games and Music)

Posted in cinema, music, nostalgia, reviews/opinions, television on October 25, 2010 by reccaphoenix

It being 2010 now, everyone’s doing the whole retrospective thing.  I am SO unqualified to do this as a “best by some aesthetic standard” list, because I wasn’t really old enough to have a good critical eye/ear when the decade began, and because there’s just so much out there that I simply haven’t seen.  I’m just going to go with my personal favorites – the things I enjoy a lot, whether they’re “lasting greats” or not – of the noughties.  So no flaming.

And by the way, these lists were very hard to narrow down.  There were a lot that *nearly* made it (and probably would make it if I revised these lists) but I had to draw the line somewhere.  Unfortunately.

Best Films – doesn’t include re-releases, restorations, or sequels.  I’m only going with one from each major director/animation studio as well (because otherwise this list would be 60% Pixar films…)

  1. Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (dir. Peter Weir, USA 2003) This movie has everything – great characters, AMAZING sound design and editing, great sets, a thrilling story, wonderful suspense, a beautiful soundtrack, and lots of great naval battles.  Every time I watch it, it gets better, and in my opinion it holds up as well as another historical epic, my #2 favorite movie of all time, Lawrence of Arabia.  God damn, this is a good movie.  Definitely my favorite to come out of this decade, no question.
  2. Ratatouille (Pixar, USA 2007) If I have to pick just one Pixar film for this top-10, then it has to be this one.  It has a great soundtrack, great dialogue, lots of fun and humor, and timelessly beautiful settings.  The sheer amount of detail and love put into this film is just astounding, and it’s a film that not only blew me away the first time I saw it, but actually got better with repeat viewings.  And I just love how the end credits are done in traditional animation – Pixar isn’t losing touch with their roots, that’s for sure.  Bravo for proving CGI animation worthy in my eyes, Pixar.
  3. Millenium Actress (dir. Satoshi Kon, Japan 2001) A great film that makes amazing use of both the film medium and the animated film medium, and one of the best and most interesting examples of “postmodernism” I’ve ever seen.  Most people prefer Kon’s other 2000s film Paprika, but this one speaks to me more as a film buff so I had to pick it over Paprika.  The film jumps through Japanese history, Japanese cinema history (and a bit of anime history too, one could argue), the history of the main character’s acting career, as well as the progress of her romantic pursuits.  It takes a lot of skill to tell so many story threads in one film without losing the audience.  Did I mention that the entire film is framed in a sort of meta-film documentary as well?  This is one impressive film, and if it sounds confusing – surprisingly, it’s not – it’s pretty easy to follow, although knowing about Japanese history and Japanese film helps.
  4. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (dir. Peter Jackson, USA 2001) This, in my opinion, is a modern-day revival of the old epics of the ’50s and ’60s.  I have to give Peter Jackson and WETA a huge tip o’ the hat for using a lot of REAL stuff and not just reverting to CGI entirely, and for having the bollocks to knock out a generally faithful and highly entertaining adaptation of what is arguably the greatest fantasy series out there.  This film is just so…dense….with awesome and detail, kind of like the old Star Wars films, that it’s great to watch again and again.
  5. The Triplets of Belleville (dir. Sylvain Chomet, France/Belgium/UK/Canada 2003) A triumph of unconventional animation and retro style weirdness that one wouldn’t expect to find in this decade.  There’s almost no talking in this film, which is an achievement in itself.  It’s surreal, funny, crazy, and reminds me of political cartoons.  Plus, it has a great soundtrack, and some amusing stereotypes of French and American people.  The CGI may be a bit odd in parts, but the film is still pretty damn awesome.
  6. No Country For Old Men (dir. Cohen Bros., USA 2007) A modern-day suspense classic.  The acting and sound design are top-notch, and the story is riveting.  I think the reason they gave Javier Bardem’s character that silly haircut was to take the edge off his otherwise-terrifying character…and to prove that even someone with that haircut could be totally scary.  He’s an amazing actor.  But anyhow, since I can only pick one Cohen movie for my favorite of the decade, it’s this one.
  7. The Cat Returns and Spirited Away (Studio Ghibli, Japan 2002, 2001) It’s a tie between these two.  The Cat Returns didn’t get a very wide release, and I honestly like it just as much as Spirited Away (which DID get a huge release and tons of press – it was the first Ghibli film that a lot of Americans saw, thanks to Ghibli’s deal with Disney – although its Buena Vista affiliation generated some pretty lame English voice talent and translation, though it could be far worse).  Both of these films, and Ghibli films in general, are so beautiful, fun, and magical.  And both are thematically similar, dealing with a “real world” girl being transported into an alternate reality populated by non-humans.
  8. School of Rock (dir. Richard Linklater, USA 2003)
  9. Angel-A (dir. Luc Besson, France 2005)
  10. Amelie (dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet, France 2001)

*honourable mention: Casino Royale was just edged off the list – it deserves at least a shout-out if nothing else.  Also, I only just saw Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story which was utterly hilarious and also deserves a shout-out, as does The Princess and the Frog for getting back to what Disney does right, and Inglourious Basterds for being downright awesome, good old-fashioned Nazi-killin’ ultraviolent fun.*

Best Television Series – doesn’t include re-runs or “remixes” (ála Dragonball Kai).  No TV movies – only miniseries and series.  I’m being unfair here and including spinoffs and sequel series, if they occur separately and not just as extra seasons of the same show.

  1. Life on Mars (BBC, UK 2006-7)
  2. Top Gear (BBC, UK 2002-present)
  3. Ashes to Ashes (BBC, UK 2008-present)
  4. Cranford (BBC, UK 2007)
  5. South Park (Comedy Central, USA 1997-present)
  6. Samurai Jack (Cartoon Network, USA 2001-4)
  7. Flight of the Conchords (HBO, USA 2007-9)
  8. The Boondocks (Cartoon Network, USA 2005-present)
  9. Kino’s Journey (WOWOW, Japan 2003)
  10. Kingdom Hospital (ABC, USA 2004)

*honourable mention: Rome (it was pretty good but I never finished watching it, so I feel unqualified to judge it) and Doctor Who with David Tennant (because I’m a huge nerd)*

Best Video Games – doesn’t include re-releases of pre-2000 games unless they have been significantly altered. Only one game per franchise.

  1. Kingdom Hearts (Squaresoft, PS2, 2002)
  2. The Beatles: Rock Band (Harmonix, Wii/PS3/Xbox360, 2009)
  3. Black Jack Hinotori Hen (Sega, DS, 2007)
  4. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney (DS remake) (Capcom, DS, 2005)
  5. Final Fantasy Tactics A2: Grimoire of the Rift (Square Enix, DS, 2007)
  6. Devil May Cry (Capcom, PS2, 2001)
  7. BioShock (2K Games, PS3/Xbox360/Mac/PC, 2007)
  8. Onimusha 3: Demon Siege (Capcom, PS2, 2005)
  9. WarioWare: Twisted! (Nintendo, GBA, 2004)
  10. Dynasty Warriors 4 (Koei, PS2, 2003)

*honourable mentions: Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance for GBA and King of Fighters 2000 for NeoGeo*

Is it just me or are “console exclusives” becoming increasingly rare these days?  Maybe it’s so the companies can make more money….

Best Albums – doesn’t include compilations or greatest hits collections, although I am counting remixes.  Only one album per artist.

  1. Guero (Beck, 2005)
  2. Love (The Beatles/George and Giles Martin, 2006)
  3. Employment (Kaiser Chiefs, 2005)
  4. Disney Bossa Nova (Various Artists, 2004)
  5. The Grey Album (DJ Danger Mouse [remixing Jay-Z and The Beatles], 2004)
  6. Friendly Fire (Sean Lennon, 2006)
  7. Demon Days (Gorillaz, 2005)
  8. Chaos and Creation in the Backyard (Paul McCartney, 2005)
  9. Crescent (Gackt, 2003)
  10. 100 Days, 100 Nights (Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, 2007)

(top comics/manga of the decade to come later, perhaps)

Sorry, guys – I never really finished working on this ages ago but I decided to just publish it anyway for the heck of it.  Hope you enjoy the fragment 😛

“updated” cartoon Beatles

Posted in artwork, music, television with tags , on May 5, 2010 by reccaphoenix

A little experiment where I drew the late-period Beatles in the style of the Beatles TV cartoon.

click for fullsize