Archive for the japan Category

Double Feature Review: Zeta Gundam (1985-86) and Char’s Counterattack (1988)

Posted in anime, future + scifi, japan, reviews/opinions, television on March 4, 2014 by reccaphoenix

**Note: I wrote this post some time ago and somehow neglected to publish it.  Finally got around to it, put in some minor updates.**

Continuing with my recent trend of Gundam-shows-by-Tomino/Universal Century Gundam shows, I immediately started watching Zeta (the direct, 5-years-later sequel to MS Gundam) and followed up with Char’s Counterattack.
*note for nerds: I realize that I’m not being totally chronological here: Double Zeta review possibly to come later, I’m in the middle of that one now*

If this review had to be one word: Wow.  If this review had to be one sentence: Zeta has everything that MS Gundam has…times 3.

First, and least importantly, there is at least 3 times the face slapping and punching.  There was enough to base a whole drinking game on.  Amuro got his fair share of the “Bright slap” back in MS Gundam and now Kamille gets his.  Kamille is initially even more of a whiny little bastard than Amuro was, so I can’t say that he didn’t deserve some of them, but I started feeling sorry for him when he gets the crap beat out of him by Wong-san, especially because that was partially motivated by Haro.  Haro gets too much abuse in this show.

3 times the drama. At least:  the Newtype emotional drama, which really only played into the final episodes of MS Gundam, takes center stage here.  There are more Newtypes…and many female Newtypes.  You can see what’s coming.

This brings me to another point.  Gundam series have become increasingly derivative of Zeta and MS Gundam since those shows aired, even if the new series are “alternate universe” affairs.  And sadly, even Zeta jumps on that train a little.  The first time we had newtype love + tragic death in a 3-person fight (via Lalah/Amuro/Char) it was sad.  This time, Amuro/Char (can’t remember which) even points out that “gee, it’s just like that OTHER SERIES.”  But they do it again.  And it’s still sad.  But it happens again in Char’s Counterattack…which I’ll get to.

The Song: I LOVE the first opening, Zeta: Toki o Koete.  I love that it is the Neil Sedaka song “Better Days Are Coming” with Tomino-penned spacey lyrics and funky ’80s electronic instruments.  I’ve learned to play it on my ukulele and I play and sing it bossa nova style all the friggin’ time now.  It has become my favorite anime opening of all time.  Interesting note: the ending theme and second opening are also both Japanese-lyrics versions of Neil Sedaka (which is why they are not on the US DVDs).

Character Development:  Seeing so many characters return from the last series was fantastic, and I loved most of the “new guys” just as much.  Here’s some impressions:

  • Kai Shiden is a total badass now, not just a snarky teen.  What they did with this character was great, even though he didn’t show up much.
  • What happened to Sayla?  She only appears for a second, and doesn’t even talk.  I love Sayla and I wish that she had played more of a role in the sequels.  Apparently she and Amuro had more of a romance in the novels of MS Gundam and they even had sexy time on the White Base.  Whhaaaaat.  Does Bright Noa allow sexy time on the White Base?  Or does he overlook it because he is too busy checking out Miss Mirai Yashima.  You KNOW that staring at her backside for months had to be one of the motivating factors behind that sudden “Hey girl, Mirai, I can be that guy for you” confession (so cute) in the latter part of MS Gundam.  But I digress.  (Keep it together!!!)
  • Amuro is a lot cooler now.  It is really interesting to see an emotional teenage boy grow up into someone struggling with his past and reluctant to go back to fighting.
  • Four Murasame: I can’t. I’ll start crying.  FOUUUURRRRR….you were so ’80s-tastic.
  • Rosamia Badam I could do without.  She’s another anime “Onii-chan”-ing clinger.  This has basically become a trope by now, and–big surprise–it happens again in other Gundam series.
  • I loved the return of all the MS Gundam characters.  It was fantastic.  Even though Mirai Yashima, er, Mirai Noa is a housewife now.
  • I’m going to stop now before I start ranting again.

This is all really disorganized, but I’ll sum it up: See this series, especially if you’ve seen the original MS Gundam.  It’s amazing.  I’d rather urge you to see it than fill in my likely-to-be-novel-length list of opinions on Zeta.

Char’s Counterattack

Don’t get me wrong, this is a really good movie.  But I have some issues with it.  Warning: serious spoiler alerts, because I want to discuss this one fully.

Another time-jump in Universal Century brings us into a situation where Char and Amuro are on opposite sides of the battlefield again.  And the old Lalah situation comes back to haunt them.  Ironically (of course), there’s a new love triangle….er….polygon brewing with our new characters, Hathaway Noa (obligatory kid-of-chara-from-original-series), resident Char fangirl Quess, Char’s lady friend Nanai, Char, Amuro, Chen Agi (substitute Beltorchika-san for the movie), and Char’s assistant Gyunei.  So maybe it’s not so derivative.  Char’s cooking up a plan to attack the earth and Amuro has to stop him.  That’s the plot, basically.

New characters.  Quite a few of them.  Here’s my take on a couple:

  • Quess Paraya: if you didn’t already notice from my assessment of Quess as the “resident Char fangirl,” I don’t particularly like this character.  I think she’s interesting, but her execution veers into Mary Sue territory.  As if somebody said “Oh boy, I’m gonna write a fanfic where I’m a super cute girl who’s the BEST PILOT EVAR and I fall in love with Char Aznable and Amuro and they fight over meeee.”  That being said, Tomino writes believable teenagers, and I’ve known a few girls like this.  Still, I would’ve liked to have seen her not blatantly state her motivations and feelings all the time.  Show don’t tell, geez.  But we’re working with a two hour movie, so I can forgive the filmmakers on this one.  Lalah is how a character like this should be written, Quess is not.  But we’re dealing with 20 years of separation, and cute plucky girl had become more of an anime trope by the early ’90s.  And I guess Gundam was missing a Lolita type character aside from Elpeo Puru in ZZ (who I would trade for Quess any day).
  • Hathaway: Basically, Hathaway is like the Katz Kobayashi of this movie.  Kid-from-older-series-returns-and-repeats-mistakes-of-older-generation.  But I don’t have any complaints.  He has a Haro, and you all know that I LOVE HARO.
  • Gyunei: I liked this one.  He was interesting, given that he is really loyal to Char but also intensely wants Quess for himself.  I also don’t think we’ve seen a volunteer artificial Newtype yet (i.e. not all messed up in the head), so that was interesting.
  • Haro (just kidding): Seriously, though, I love Haro and I wish he had more screen time in every single Gundam series, if only to say “HARO. HARO AMURO” and tell everybody when they are emotionally stressed.  Everybody should have a Haro.  I want a Haro.  The closest I have is the Haro alarm clock I got for Christmas, which keeps calling me “Amuro” for some reason.
  • Nanai: I love that Char has a love interest who is not Lalah.  Especially after Amuro got one/two (Beltorchika/Chen).  And the fact that (uh, spoiler) Char is really just manipulating all of these love interests and others makes it all so interesting.  That being said, it was kind of inevitable that the film ends the way it does, because I don’t think he could have kept up the double-crossing.

It’s that very double-crossing and manipulation that, along with his crazy plan, turned Char into a “bad guy” again (for me at least).  Char/Quattro is still sympathetic but he is not Quattro anymore.  He’s not the cool mentor that he was in Zeta.  This is a brilliant turn of events and really makes the film “work” for me, especially because Amuro and Char made so much headway towards forgiving each other (or at least tolerating each other) in Zeta.  The only one who was totally unforgiving of Char then seemed to be Kai Shiden, and we know how he rolls.  Snark snark.

Admittedly, Char’s whole drop-colony-on-Earth plan starts the fight, though.  And that’s another thing – Char wants to save the earth, and even though his colony drop would make everybody evacuate, a nuclear winter isn’t the most environmentally friendly of methods for doing that.  So the whole idea seems a little forced.  What made Char change so much between Zeta and here?  Was it the fact that the Argama replaced its emotionally laden teens and badass women with a plucky group of scavenger kiddies and that the show got all cartoony?  But I digress.

Anyhow, as I said before, Newtype love triangles are getting old at this point.  It’s hard to get emotionally invested in this one, because we only just met the new characters.  Well, OK, we “knew” Hathaway as a child, but he had no lines and didn’t do anything.  And literally, the original Newtype love triangle is at the root of this entire movie.  The one sentence summary for this one is “Two grown men are still fighting about the same thing and keep fighting about it till they die fighting about it.”  It’s kind of funny that they just keep going at it until the end.

However we got into this Amuro-Char standoff, though, it’s happening.  So what do I think of it?  Like I said, the movie itself is on par with Zeta in terms of quality in storytelling and characters.  But the movie format compresses everything, which can make characters’ actions make less sense.  It also gives us less time to learn about the new batch (Quess, Hathaway, Chen, Char’s love interest, etc.) – as a new series, this film could have been fantastic.  I probably would have liked it better.  But what we get is still great and a good “makeup” for the goofiness of Double Zeta, which I’m sure most fans appreciated.  (I myself have yet to form a solid opinion of ZZ because I’m still watching it).

Some additional notes of the humor variety:

  • I love that Gyunei straight up says that Char  has “lolicon” (Lolita complex).  I figure somebody might have noticed that over the years.  I guess he never got over Lalah and, like Humbert Humbert, is forever chasing the memory of preteen love.  How old is Quess again? 13? Er, uncomfortable.  Although at the end of the film it seems that they didn’t really have a “thing” after all.
  • I was shocked that Beltorchika-san was not around (wasn’t she Amuro’s “girlfriend” or whatever?), only to find out that Beltorchika literally replaces Chen’s role in Tomino’s novelization of the movie.  That makes sense.  Why not use Beltorchika, though?
  • It was nice to see Mirai Noa again.  Will she ever get into space to see her husband?  Has she been trying since Zeta?  That’s so sad….
  • Amuro has literally been wearing the same kind of underwear since the space ’70s.  No, I’m serious, it’s in the movie.  Ha ha ha.  Let’s hope it’s not the same set, although if Fraw Bow was the only thing that got Amuro into the shower back in MS Gundam, maybe he’s still that much of a slob.  Gross.
  • Speaking of which, Boyfriend and I had a running joke that Bright Noa only owns two outfits: (1) Earth Federation uniform; and (2) space suit.  Evidenced by the fact that even when he joined the AEUG in Zeta, he kept wearing the Earth Federation (the enemy’s!) uniform.  And I’m pretty sure that he’s been wearing THE SAME uniform the whole time because you can’t get new clothes in space.
  • Who the hell gave Bright Noa EYEBALLS?  He looks so weird.  I know the ’70s style characters didn’t necessarily mesh with all the others, but I liked them that way.  I lost faith in humanity when Bright Noa got whites in his eyes.  Now I should really get that tattoo back piece of Bright Noa bitch-slapping Amuro Ray with Japanese ukiyo-e waves in the background and a Haro flying through the sky….but I digress.

A Conclusion

After these two, I started up Double Zeta (the direct sequel to Zeta), which I’ll cover in another review when I finish it.  It’s a huge, sudden, and extremely awkward tone shift after Zeta’s depressing drama bomb ending, and I’ve got mixed feelings at the moment.

And I just felt like I wanted more.  There are still so many unanswered questions and untold stories about the White Base and Argama crews.  I couldn’t help but long for a “third” series – a series that could be to Zeta what Zeta was to MS Gundam.  But at the same time, I could see that Char’s Counterattack was starting to get derivative.  Even the alternate universe Gundam shows are mostly derivative now, so would we really want rehash after rehash of the same old stories and Newtype drama with Bright Noa’s children and all the others?  Perhaps it’s for the best.  Often, shows that people wanted to keep going but ended instead are the most fondly remembered.

I know that Gundam Unicorn tried to pick up the Universal Century story recently, but I haven’t watched it so I can’t speak to the quality of that show.  I figure that if it was a truly good sequel, I probably would have heard more about it, and Tomino wasn’t involved.  My next steps are to watch all of the Tomino Gundam series, Space Runaway Ideon, and perhaps Gundam Unicorn (despite its silly name).  I’ll be reporting back here, maybe, after I do that (if I do).

As always,

Recca

Review: Mobile Suit Gundam (1979)

Posted in anime, future + scifi, japan, reviews/opinions, television with tags , , on March 15, 2013 by reccaphoenix

Long absence, I know.  But I just wanted to share my thoughts on a remarkable little anime series from the ’70s.

When I was 13, and a big nerdy Gundam Wing fangirl, Cartoon Network started showing Mobile Suit Gundam after the conclusion of Wing.  I stopped watching the show after a few episodes because I didn’t like any of the characters and I thought it was lame and cliche.  But boy, did I misjudge it.

I just finished watching the entire series (in Japanese, if you must know) and I really enjoyed it.  If you compare it with everything that came before (cartoony giant robots), it was really groundbreaking.

A quick summary for the uninitiated (no spoilers): This is the first show in the long-running Gundam series, which involves vaguely samurai-like humanoid giant robots in some variety of warfare.  In MS Gundam, Amuro Ray and a group of military and civilians survive an attack on their space colony and are drawn into conflict with the evil Principality of Zeon.  World War II…IN SPACE, sort of.

My favorite point came towards the end of the series, where there are some truly avant-garde psychedelic (and most likely 2001: A Space Odyssey-inspired) moments as the series spirals quickly towards its epic conclusion.

Speaking of influences from other films, I definitely can feel some Star Trek influence in MS Gundam.  The multicultural cast (their names are a combination of German, Japanese, Spanish, English, and other influences), strong military women, and “space navy” theme are clearly present.  On that note, I think that MS Gundam most likely started the Gundam series’ tradition of strong female characters.  Sayla, Hamon, and Lalah are some tough and awesome ladies and were enjoyable to follow through the series.

I enjoy anime from the 1970s – the hand-drawn dusty cel look is charming to me, I guess.  The retro look and feel of MS Gundam is great, as is the disco-style funky battle music and J-folk ending theme.  While the opening theme song recalls other giant robot series in that it is mainly about the Gundam itself, it’s catchy, upbeat, and infectiously fun.

Let’s talk about the characters, which are really the best thing in the show, in my opinion.  These are some of the best-loved characters in Japan and I hope my descriptions and opinions here do them justice.

Let’s start with the White Base crew.  I grew to love this bunch of tough folks with funny names, along with the obligatory pack-o’-orphans (Kikka, Katz, and Letz) that add comic relief here and there.  MS Gundam gets in a lot of character development, which is one thing that Gundam Wing didn’t do so well (there were really too many characters).  Amuro has his issues and moments, but that’s probably realistically to be expected of a teenage boy.  My boyfriend and I both posited that we would probably be the Kai Shiden of the group if thrown into the same situation (laziness, snark, etc.).

…now for the bad guys.  While pretty much all the Zeons have something….kinda…wrong…with them in terms of appearance (they all have purple hair, weird body shapes, look sickly, etc), that just adds to their evil appearance.  Char Aznable, who Japanese people love “three times more” (qualifier used to describe Char’s mechas) than pretty much anything else, is a cool dude.  And the foundation for every masked baddie in anime (and every masked bad guy in Gundam, pretty much) since the ’70s.  Char was the only thing that kept me watching MS Gundam as a 13-year-old.

Did I mention that there is a lot of face slapping and punching?

Image

(c) Bandai/Sunrise/Sotsu Agency. Not my image.

 

….yeah.  Good to know that Kai gets slapped around almost as much as Amuro.  Slegger Law’s only purpose as a character is basically (1) to slap a bitch and (2) to hit on the ladies of White Base.

Okay, now for the bad points.  This show was made partially to sell toys.  So the Gundam does a lot of really goofy transforming stuff that is often used as episode filler.  Also, some of the designs weren’t quite up to the “realistic robot” standards that Tomino envisioned when he conceived of Gundam, and come off as…well, silly.  But I can’t really complain about this, since the Gundam and friends still look ten times more realistic than most of their contemporary giant robot brethren, who look like the mecha from Power Rangers or plastic toys.

Well, that’s it for my disorganized quick review blurb.  I hope you will check this series out, it’s a real gem.

(…and before you ask, yes, I am a colossal nerd and have already started watching the sequel, Zeta Gundam.  Will I review that?  Maybe.)

Manyoshu and Kokinshu art films

Posted in cinema, japan, video with tags , , , , , , , on July 30, 2011 by reccaphoenix

Made for a premodern Japanese literature class by me and my friends. Our project (3 separate films) translated poems from the Kokinshu, Manyoshu, and Shinkokinshu (3 Japanese poetry anthologies) into the content and visual styles of our films.  Unfortunately I have lost the Shinkokinshu film file.

See my friend Susannah’s Kokinshu film here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlwGXFiapQE

My main influences here were Antonioni’s ‘Red Desert’ and ‘Blow-Up.’ I tried to reflect the ambiguous yet simple voice in the Manyoshu poems in a cinematic style reminiscent of Italian Neorealism.

Concept, Cinematography, Direction, Production – Recca Phoenix
Boy – An Hoang
Girl – Susannah Davidson

Edited in iMovie
Titles edited in Final Cut Pro

(c) 2007 Reccalux

“Human Metamorphoses” 「人間昆虫記」by Osamu Tezuka

Posted in anime, japan, manga, mod, movie posters, osamu tezuka, reviews/opinions with tags , , , , on May 26, 2009 by reccaphoenix

**UPDATE (12/29/10): Vertical has announced at Comic-con that they are translating Human Metamorphoses (they’re calling it “Book of Human Insects”….subtle….), so you can look forward to an English version soon-ish!**

Osamu Tezuka, my favourite comic artist of all time, the father of all Japanese comics and animation, branched out a lot in the late 1960s and 1970s.  At a time when many manga artists were moving towards more serious, sexually explicit, and violent subjects, Tezuka also wrote many of his most dark, mature, and psychologically profound works: Yakeppachi no Maria (a strange, sexual, pseudo-educational manga about which I will probably write another time), MW [Muu] (Tezuka’s darkest work in my opinion), Barbara, Ayako, I.L., and several others were all written by Tezuka between 1969 and 1978.  Though I love almost all of Tezuka’s work, this period is particularly interesting to me for many reasons.  Tezuka not only began to experiment with art style, layout, content, and presentation but also integrated some of the aesthetics of the times into his work.  As a fan of 1960s and modernist aesthetics, I find it fascinating to see ’60s and ’70s styles reflected in the medium of manga.  Furthermore, these works allow a glimpse into Tezuka’s true artistic talent; though he stuck to “cartoony,” Disney-like characters for much of his career, he was highly skilled at more realistic rendering and at adjusting his style to different genres and situations.

konchuki0Tezuka wrote Human Metamorphoses (「人間昆虫記」Ningen Konchuuki) in 1970-1, during this same fascinating period of experimentation.  It is unfortunately not available in English translation, but I recently finished reading it in Japanese and wanted to share my opinions.

I only wish I had a scanner at the moment, as the artwork and layout in many of the page spreads is fantastic; it’s hard to convey just how awesome this manga is without the images to back it up.  For now, you’ll have to settle with scans found on the internet.  Images that some may find objectionable due to mature content will be linked to off-site.

Human Metamorphoses, like another famous Tezuka work called Birdman Anthology, draws parallels between humans and animals – in this case, insects.  Many of the characters even have the kanji of the insect in question in their name.  The main character is the beautiful, fashionable Tomura Toshiko, likened to the haruzemi (the terpnosia vacua cicada), moves through life constantly reinventing herself amid a succession of lovers, shedding her previous identities like the cicada sheds its shell.  Toshiko is ruthless yet subtle, convinced that her actions are justified.  Most of her successes rely on plagiarism and blackmail, yet she is able to Continue reading

The REAL story behind the USA localization of “Astro Boy”

Posted in advertising, anime, future + scifi, japan, manga, television with tags , , on May 20, 2009 by reccaphoenix
Astro Boy or Mighty Atom? Or Tetsuwan Atomu?

Astro Boy or Mighty Atom? Or Tetsuwan Atomu?

Everyone loves Astro Boy.  He’s world-famous, lovable, and righteous.  What about Mighty Atom?  Or Tetsuwan Atomu?  Or 鉄腕アトム?  Those are his “real” names and their various translations and transliterations….but why did his name change when he was imported to the U.S.A.?

Well, the common myth is that “Mighty Atom” (1) had too strong a connection with “atomic bombs” and similar ideas, and/or (2) sounded too much like existing characters “Mighty Mouse” and “Atom Ant,” and was therefore changed to the unoffensive “Astro Boy.”  But recently, some ‘research’ of mine suggested otherwise….

For the English version, the producers, NBC Enterprises, settled on “Astro Boy” after discussions with producer Fred Ladd and representatives from NBC led them to the name. (The title “Mighty Atom” for an atomic powered robot, as “Astro Boy” was thought of back then, was considered too generic and not “catchy enough” a title for a program for American TV.)

(taken from the “Astro Boy” article on wikipedia)

So, it was really just a question of what was catchy, I suppose.  When you think about it, poor Leo the lion went through something similar.  Leo is such a stereotypical lion name in Western countries, while “Kimba” sounds exotic and African.  What sounds more rare and exciting than “Kimba the White Lion”?  I guess “Jungle Emperor Leo” just doesn’t have that “kid show” ring to it, now that I think about it.

Things have changed quite a bit from the “old days,” where localizers often went to great lengths to make sure a show didn’t appear “Japanese” in any way.  Even as recently as when I was a little girl watching Sailor Moon, I remember that all the signs were painted over to have English on them and all the characters’ names were changed to “English” ones.  In recent years, however, dubbers and localizers have responded to changes in audience and the audience’s increased knowledge of/interest in Japanese culture and anime and minimalized changes.

‘Clockwork Orange’ manga: “Outer Alec” (アウターレック)

Posted in clockwork orange, japan, manga with tags , , , , , , , on April 17, 2009 by reccaphoenix

Not going to give a lot of background here, but the other day I got a chance to flip through a 1973 issue of the Japanese weekly shounen (boy’s) manga magazine Shounen Jump.  While perusing this, I came across what appeared to be a manga-style Alex deLarge lookalike:
(click image for fullsize)

"Outer Alec" title page, the only image of this manga I can find anywhere on the internet.

"Outer Leck" title page, the only image of this manga I can find anywhere on the internet. The subtitle for this chapter is "man-eating beasts."

This manga is called “アウターレック” which transliterates to “Outer Leck” or “Outer Alec” (I’ve seen it written as both アウターレック and あうたあれっく, but people in the manga seem to call the main character “Leck” [レック] most of the time.)  “Outer Leck” seems to be a sci-fi story packed with (ultra-)violence – Leck is some kind of wanted criminal with a price on his head.

Leck’s appearance (bowler hat, haircut, and dark false bottom-eyelashes) heavily resembles that worn by A Clockwork Orange‘s hero Alex deLarge in Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 film version of the novel, and his name (with adjustments for odd Japanese transliteration) is similar to Alex, which is アレックス in Japanese.  The manga came out in 1973, so similarities to the film are likely far more than coincedental – Leck even has a cane-sword almost exactly like Alex’s.

This manga is virtually unknown and was never issued in tankoubon (book compilations which re-publish the story outside of the magazine).  The only info I can find is in Japanese, and has not told me much.  This manga only ran for 19 issues in 1973 (Shonen Jump 1973 #8-27) and was written by the author of the popular series “Worst,” Koutarou Komuro.

This comic constitutes another example of A Clockwork Orange‘s widespread international influence.  It’s an interesting find, indeed, and I only wish there were some way that I could read this manga.

Greetings from Tezuka World Kyoto!

Posted in advertising, anime, cinema, fun stuff to do, japan, manga, merchandise, osamu tezuka, reviews/opinions on April 8, 2009 by reccaphoenix

Hullo from my new home, Japan.  And sorry for the huge lapse in posting, I’ve been here and there and everywhere doing all kinds of more important things.

Honestly, it’s not as awesome as you’re thinking.  BUT there’s one awesome thing about living here and being able to read Japanese (albeit with much dictionary usage) – Tezuka manga for cheap!  And lots of Tezuka merchandise!  And Tezuka-related attractions, such as Tezuka Osamu World Kyoto, located in Kyoto Station next to the Granvia Hotel.  What is it like?  I’ll tell you.  And show you.  To the best of my ability, anyway – some of the photos are so-so.

Stepping off the bus and up to the train station, I noticed some awesome posters and figures-with-arrows pointing the way to Tezuka World (click images for fullsize)

Astro!

Leo!

Leo again!

....and a whole bunch of obscure and famous charas, too!

After following these signs, I finally arrived at the front entrance of Tezuka World!  It’s hard to see in the photo, but the signs outside the building are actually 3-D hologram type graphics.

Tezuka World entrance

And then…I went inside…. and saw some awesome life-size figures of Black Jack, Sapphire, Leo, and Astro Boy, as well as an awesome mural with tons of Tezuka characters on it.

The 4 life-size photo-op figures.

BJ skulking around with Sapphire next to an awesome mural.

Then, I went to the main attraction – the store. I spent almost an hour looking at tons and tons of merchandise, some of it exclusive to Kyoto Tezuka World, and ended up buying some, which you can see here (along with the Tezuka-related results of my separate manga shopping trip).

some flyers from Tezuka World, 2 Dororo mangas, an Astro Boy pencil case and pencil board, Pinoco folder, 3-eyed one manga, ticket from Tezuka World theater, and a Hinotori Kyoto pen.

But back to Tezuka World…

The other main attraction is the “Anime Theater,” where you can watch a short movie on a flatscreen TV in a dark “theater” decorated with images from many different Tezuka works.  The movie tickets are on sale in the store, and the movie plays on the :05 and :35 of every hour.  The programme changes every month.  The cost is 200 Yen (about 2 U.S. dollars) for an adult.  The programme names and schedule are listed on the flyers they have near the entrance with Sharaku on them (there’s one in the photo of the stuff I bought).  The ticket also lets you use the “Mini Library,” which has comfy seats and a huge selection of Tezuka manga to read (in Japanese, of course).

According to the flyer, the programme for April is supposed to be “Black Jack and Jungle Emperor Leo” but it’s “in planning” right now, so that’s probably why they showed the December programme, “The Secret of Astro’s Birth,” on the day I was there.  I thought I’d record my impressions of the film, even though chances are that you wouldn’t see the same one if you decided to go to Tezuka World Kyoto.

Anime Theater Programme: “The Secret of Astro’s Birth”

The film starts out with a *mysterious figure* (that anyone acquainted with the series could identify as Dr. Tenma) breaking into a science lab.  Flashbacks, etc. inform us that he is stealing a mobile laboratory spaceship to work on some project.  Ochanomizu tries to stop him, but is shoved into something and locked up.  Later, he and the authorities try to hunt down and stop Tenma, who is on his way to Mars (working on his experiment along the way).  Flashbacks show us Tobio (Tenma’s son) in the days leading up to his accident, and give us an idea of Tenma’s relationship with him.  As any idiot could guess, Tenma’s “project” is the creation of Astro Boy.  Chase scenes, high tension “drama,” etc. follow, leading up to the inevitable – Tenma is caught and must return to earth, but he is allowed to finish working on Astro.  Standard Astro birth scene follows.

In short, this was a canon prequel to Astro’s story.  It was a little heavy on the “suspense drama,” seriousness, and emotional flashbacks in my opinion.  Come on, this is Astro Boy we’re talking about here.  Not gekiga.  The animation, done in the style of the “new Astro” of the 2000’s, is a bit shiny for my tastes.  Part of what I love about Tezuka is the simplicity of his designs, which doesn’t always translate well into the hyper-detailed modern anime style.  Anyway, it was worthwhile entertainment for 2 bucks and it WAS Tezuka….but if this wasn’t in the venue it was in, I wouldn’t really recommend it except to die-hard Astro fans, though they might be more disappointed than the average viewer, now that I think about it.

Anyway, that’s my take on Tezuka Osamu World Kyoto, and I hope it was worth your time.